Posts Tagged ‘American history’

Who is Uncle Sam, Anyway?

Friday, June 13th, 2014

Wondering who Uncle Sam really is? We did some research into this iconic United States figure and here is what we found, courtesy of the History Channel:

Uncle Sam at SturbridgeOn September 7, 1913, the United States gets its nickname, Uncle Sam. The name is linked to Samuel Wilson, a meat packer from Troy, New York, who supplied barrels of beef to the United States Army during the War of 1812. Wilson stamped the barrels with “U.S.” (for United States), but soldiers began referring to the grub as “Uncle Sam’s.” Local newspapers picked up on the story and Uncle Sam eventually gained nationwide acceptance as the nickname for the United States federal government.

In the late 1860s and 1870s, political cartoonist Thomas Nast started to popularize the image of Uncle Sam. Nast continued to evolve the image, eventually giving Sam the white beard and stars-and-stripes suit that are associated with the character today.

Perhaps the most famous image of Uncle Sam was created by artist James Montgomery Flagg. In Flagg’s version, Uncle Sam wears a tall top hat and blue jacket and is pointing straight ahead at the viewer. During World War I, this portrait of Sam with the words “I Want You For The U.S. Army” was used as a recruiting poster. The image, which became immensely popular, was first used on the cover of Leslie’s Weekly in July 1916 with the title “What Are You Doing for Preparedness?” The poster was widely distributed and has subsequently been re-used numerous times with different captions.

In September 1961, the U.S. Congress recognized Samuel Wilson as “the progenitor of America’s national symbol of Uncle Sam.” Wilson died at age 88 in 1854, and was buried next to his wife Betsey Mann in the Oakwood Cemetery in Troy, New York, the town that calls itself “The Home of Uncle Sam.”

There you have it, straight from the historians themselves!

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Celebrate National Flag Week 2013

Friday, June 14th, 2013

Chair Family Flag PrintThe Second Constitutional Congress adopted a flag with thirteen stripes and thirteen stars to represent our Nation on June 14, 1777. One star represented each of our founding colonies. The Congress’s resolution stated that the stars would be displayed upon a blue field, “representing a new constellation” in the night sky.

On August 3, 1949, to commemorate the adoption of our flag, Congress, by joint resolution designated June 14 of each year as “Flag Day.” On June 9, 1966, Congress approved the week in which June 14th occurs as “National Flag Week.” During this time, our government calls upon its citizens to display the flag as well as to have the flag adorn Federal government buildings.

The American flag has been ever present and flown through the successes and struggles of the United States of America. It has been proudly carried into battle and raised as a beacon of hope. It has flown on our ships and military bases around the world, has been raised in yards and on porches across America, and is lowered on days of remembrance to honor fallen service members and public servants; or when tragedy strikes and we join together in mourning.

When the American flag soars, with it goes the ideals our nation stands for, bringing us together e pluribus unum, “out of many, one.”

Happy National Flag Week!

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Celebrate National Flag Week

Thursday, June 16th, 2011

Chair Family Flag PrintThe Second Constitutional Congress adopted a flag with thirteen stripes and thirteen stars to represent our Nation on June 14, 1777. One star represented each of our founding colonies. The Congress’s resolution stated that the stars would be displayed upon a blue field, “representing a new constellation” in the night sky.

On August 3, 1949, to commemorate the adoption of our flag, Congress, by joint resolution designated June 14 of each year as “Flag Day.” On June 9, 1966, Congress approved the week in which June 14th occurs as “National Flag Week.” During this time, our government calls upon its citizens to display the flag as well as to have the flag adorn Federal government buildings.

The American flag has been ever present and flown through the successes and struggles of the United States of America. It has been proudly carried into battle and raised as a beacon of hope. It has flown on our ships and military bases around the world,  has been raised in yards and on porches across America, and is lowered on days of remembrance to honor fallen service members and public servants; or when tragedy strikes and we join together in mourning.

When the American flag soars, with it goes the ideals our nation stands for, bringing us together e pluribus unum, “out of many, one.”

Happy National Flag Week!

Flag Barn Print13 Star Garden Flag

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